[PowerShell] Using Common Verbs for Custom PowerShell Cmdlets in C#

In my previous post, [PowerShell] Write a Custom PowerShell Cmdlet in C#, I mentioned that the commond verbs built-in to PowerShell should be used whenever possible.

Here is a listing of all of the common PowerShell verbs available in PowerShell 2.0:

  • VerbsCommon

    • Add
    • Clear
    • Close
    • Copy
    • Enter
    • Exit
    • Find
    • Format
    • Get
    • Hide
    • Join
    • Lock
    • Move
    • New
    • Open
    • Pop
    • Push
    • Redo
    • Remove
    • Rename
    • Reset
    • Search
    • Select
    • Set
    • Show
    • Skip
    • Split
    • Step
    • Switch
    • Undo
    • Unlock
    • Watch
  • VerbsCommunications

    • Connect
    • Disconnect
    • Read
    • Receive
    • Send
    • Write
  • VerbsData

    • Backup
    • Checkpoint
    • Compare
    • Compress
    • Convert
    • ConvertFrom
    • ConvertTo
    • Dismount
    • Edit
    • Expand
    • Export
    • Group
    • Import
    • Initialize
    • Limit
    • Merge
    • Mount
    • Out
    • Publish
    • Restore
    • Save
    • Sync
    • Unpublish
    • Update
  • VerbsDiagnostic

    • Debug
    • Measure
    • Ping
    • Repair
    • Resolve
    • Test
    • Trace
  • VerbsLifecycle

    • Approve
    • Assert
    • Complete
    • Confirm
    • Deny
    • Disable
    • Enable
    • Install
    • Invoke
    • Register
    • Request
    • Restart
    • Resume
    • Start
    • Stop
    • Submit
    • Suspend
    • Uninstall
    • Unregister
    • Wait
  • VerbsOther

    • Use
  • VerbsSecurity

    • Block
    • Grant
    • Protect
    • Revoke
    • Unblock
    • Unprotect

The list of available verbs is pretty extensive. There should be very few instances where one of these available verbs isn’t sufficient for your custom Cmdlets.

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